Posted November 9, 2015 11:44 am by Comments

By Ammoland

BELTSVILLE, MD - JUNE 18: Greg Klees, a firearms and toolmark examiner, fires in to a water tank, which allows both a bullet and shell casing to be easily recovered for investigation, during a media day at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms National Laboratory Center on June 18, 2013 in Beltsville, Maryland. The laboratory celebrated its 10-year anniversary with an open house for media and bureau interns to highlight the types of studies that ATF investigators from across the country perform at the center. T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images/AFP

By AWR Hawkins

BELTSVILLE, MD – JUNE 18: Greg Klees, a firearms and toolmark examiner, fires in to a water tank, which allows both a bullet and shell casing to be easily recovered for investigation, during a media day at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms National Laboratory Center on June 18, 2013 in Beltsville, Maryland. The laboratory celebrated its 10-year anniversary with an open house for media and bureau interns to highlight the types of studies that ATF investigators from across the country perform at the center. T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images/AFP
AmmoLand Gun News

Washington DC – -(Ammoland.com)- With a bill, retroactive to show an ending date of October 1 2015, the state of Maryland is ending its program to take ballistic fingerprints of firearms through shell casings…

….after 15 years, $5 million spent, and no crimes solved.

When passed by Maryland lawmakers and signed into law by Governor Parris N. Glendening (D) in 2000, ballistic fingerprinting was sold to Maryland residents as a way for police to literally use discarded crime scene shell casings to find the gun that had fired them and, thereby, the person who possessed the gun at the time of crime. To accomplish this, …Read the Rest

Source:: AmmoLand

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