Posted June 10, 2016 12:06 pm by Comments

By Justin Stakes

Giant African snail invasions in Florida and Hawaii may have originated from illegal importation of the snails as pets. Photo courtesy Andrew Dersken, USDA APHIS, Bugwood.org.

Choose environmentally safe options for pet and plant disposal

Giant African snail invasions in Florida and Hawaii may have originated from illegal importation of the snails as pets. Photo courtesy Andrew Dersken, USDA APHIS, Bugwood.org.
Michigan DNR
Michigan Department of Natural Resources

Lansing, MI -(AmmoLand.com)- As the school year wraps up, teachers around the state are packing up supplies, cleaning up classrooms and deciding what to do with classroom pets.

The Michigan Invasive Species Program reminds teachers and hobbyists not to release pets, fish or aquarium plants into the wild.

Some common classroom pets and plants are considered invasive in Michigan. Infestations of rusty crayfish and Eurasian watermilfoil throughout the state may be a result of aquarium owners releasing them into local lakes or streams. The same could happen if invaders not yet confirmed to be in Michigan – including red swamp crayfish, hydrilla, or giant African snails, all popular science exhibits – are released alive back into nature.

Currently, those are among the 55 invasive species listed as prohibited or restricted in Michigan. It is unlawful to possess, introduce, import, sell or offer these species for sale as live organisms, except under certain circumstances.

How do prohibited and restricted species …Read the Rest

Source:: AmmoLand

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