Posted September 14, 2017 9:00 am by Comments

By Tactical-Life


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<div data-cycle-hash="grand-canyon-bison-2" data-cycle-desc="An adult male bison stands in a meadow on the North Kaibab Ranger District of the Kaibab National Forest near the entrance to Grand Canyon National Park's North Rim." data-cycle-overlay-template="{{desc}}“>

grand canyon bison herd

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Photo by Wikimedia Commons/U.S. Forest Service
An adult male bison stands in a meadow on the North Kaibab Ranger District of the Kaibab National Forest near the entrance to Grand Canyon National Park’s North Rim.

Photo by National Park Service

If you’re skilled with a firearm and physically fit, the National Park Service wants your help thinning a Grand Canyon bison herd that are damaging park resources.

According to the Associated Press, the Grand Canyon bison herd are descendants of bison first introduced to northern Arizona in the early 20th century during a ranching operation to crossbreed them with cattle. They’re now owned by the state of Arizona, which has an annual draw for tags …Read the Rest

Source:: Tactical Life

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